Rotella on Fox Business Talking Impeachment to College Scandal

Cheryl Casone: I do you want to bring in from the legal perspective here, Bryan Rotella, he’s an attorney and the founder of GENCO Legal. First, your initial reactions, criminal translation. People could go to jail.

Bryan Rotella: Absolutely, Cheryl and let me tell you, I don’t think that our attorney general and the US attorney on this were in Italy having some pasta and a cannoli or something and I’m Italian I can say that. Something serious happened when they went on that trip and we all know that… Remember Joseph Mifsud? Who was the person who talked to George Papadopoulos back when this all started to get initiated and I’m bringing folks a flashback to the Mueller Report.

I have a feeling they may have talked to him and the lead into this was absolutely accurate. From a legal perspective, the subpoena power as this turns to a criminal process becomes important. Now, what I will be watching for is one, are there emails, documents out there that are actually smoking guns to make this look like what the president’s been saying, a witch hunt or does this just become folks and lying to federal attorneys and prosecutors and process crimes?

Cheryl Casone: Right. Well, we’ve been talking for a long time here, especially on Fox Business about the fact that that we need to go back and look at where this all began and was it a political hit job on President Trump? And this is criminal investigations going to bring out you’re right, more documents into the fray.

Bryan Rotella: No, Cheryl, of course not. You start to think that our politicians on both sides think this is the 1800s. We have a closed door meeting and let’s remember something here when you’re talking about impeachment all we have to look to is we don’t have to look to the 1800s or the 1920s look at Watergate. Watergate turned on televised hearings on John Dean and the public was turned on that.

I think this is really, really detrimental to the process for our country in general and as an attorney, let me tell you what is analogous here. This will be like in a business situation. If you had a board of 10 folks, two of them went into a room and told the rest of the board, “We don’t want you to hear what’s going on here, but we should fire the CEO.” That would never happen.

Cheryl Casone: One other legal question for you. It’s been a big week in the Varsity Blues College Admissions Scandal and you now have 12 people that are now going to jail but had been sentenced and there’s more charges they levied against Lori Loughlin, the actress, obviously.

Now there’s talk that they may go after, the prosecutors might go after her kids to try and pressure her into cutting a plea deal. You think a prosecutor would do that?

Bryan Rotella: Got to remember there’s spousal immunity, so your spouse can’t be compelled to testify against you, but adult kids can. So they could do, I think they will, Cheryl? No. We’ve got parents gone wild here, right?

And with Lori Loughlin, I think the big issue is going to be would a jury of lay folks in Massachusetts in Boston would they let her off for her and her husband paying allegedly $500,000 for their kid to go to USC and making up that their kids were on the crew team. I would not want to take that case to trial. So ultimately I do think a plea deal’s going to happen.

Cheryl Casone: Yeah. Well, and the cost of a trial to a lot of people think that that’s potentially a waste of money in all of this. We’ll see. Bryan Rotella, a lot of great topics covered, my fellow Italian. Appreciate it.

Bryan Rotella: Thank you Cheryl, anytime.